NCAAF Championship Winner

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With the 2021-2022 college football season expected to kick off on August 28, 2021, oddsmakers have already released college football championship odds for the upcoming season. To the surprise of absolutely no one, the usual suspects are the frontrunners yet again. Alabama leads the preseason pack of contenders, with Clemson and Ohio State rounding out the top three positions.

Oddsmakers take a variety of factors into consideration when setting lines for futures bets. Factors include a team’s win/loss record from the previous season, changes in roster (players that have graduated, transferred, or have season-ending injuries), changes in coaching personnel, strength of schedule, and overall national rankings in the polls. Setting odds, particularly so far in advance of a season, is not an exact science, and as such, many take issue with some of these factors. For example, records of wins and losses from the previous season may seem trivial, especially if a team lost several games by fewer than 7 points. However, the general rule of thumb is that any squad that returns the majority of its starters and personnel will likely be roughly as good as they were the previous season.

Perhaps other than higher than normal odds for longshot futures bets (such as +20000 for example), futures odds are read the same as other betting lines. At Sidelines, all our odds are presented in the American odds format (also known as moneyline odds). So, if you wanted to wager on the favorite, the Alabama Crimson Tide, to win the CFB national championship, at the time of writing, you would find odds at +272. What this means is that if you bet $100 on Alabama, you could potentially win $372, $272 of which would be profit (the remaining $100 being your initial outlay).

The same logic applies if you bet on a school with longshot odds to win the national championship, such as Michigan State at odds of +100000. Again, for each dollar you wager on the Spartans, you are hoping to win $1000 for a total potential payout of $100,100 ($100,000 of which is profit and $100 your initial stake). For more information on calculating payouts from odds, Sidelines offers a convenient odds calculator to aid in decision making.

College football is one of the most popular sports in the United States with millions of viewers tuning in each year and wagering billions of dollars. Given the overturning of the federal ban on sports betting in May 2018, interest in legal sports betting has expanded. As such, one of the most pertinent questions many bettors have is no longer if they can wager, but rather where they can do so legally. First of all, in order to legally bet on college football, you must be physically located in a state where betting has been legalized. For more information on legal states and the operators working therein, check out our sports betting reviews before placing any of your bets. After being verified that you are legally eligible to gamble, you will want to check a list of licensed and regulated sportsbooks and most importantly, compare the odds that each is offering on your bet in order to get the best value and maximize your payout.

In contrast to several major professional and collegiate sports, there is no permanently set date for the national championship game itself, but rather a more flexible arrangement. Semifinal games are held close to New Year’s so as to not infringe upon games that are traditionally held on that day. The College Football National Championship itself is then played on the first Monday that is six or more days after the semifinals. The 2021-22 semifinals are expected to take place on Friday, December 31, 2021 in Arlington, Texas and Miami Gardens, Florida, with the Cotton Bowl and Orange Bowl being the designated bowls. The 2022 College Football Playoff National Championship game is currently slated to be played on Monday January 10, 2002 at the Lucas Oil Stadium in Indianapolis, Indiana.

Surprisingly enough, the team who has won the most national championships in the history of college football is none other than the Yale Bulldogs, who have recorded an impressive 18. Less impressive however is their last win, which was in 1927. Alabama (no doubt everyone’s first guess), comes in second place, with 16 national titles, the last of which was in 2020.